Cover Letter Sample For Internship Application Process

Now that you know how to write that ever-so-perfect resume, it’s time to WOW potential employers with a cover letter that leaves them in awe of your skills, and gives you what you’re looking for — an interview, and hopefully a job!

Step 1: Figure out the employee's name and contact information.

When composing a cover letter, knowing the name of the employee to send your letter to, her position in the company, and the address of the company is crucial. An easy reason for someone to toss your application in the trash is spelling his or her name wrong. Put all this information on your cover letter — it may seem tedious but it’s professional and it gives an immediate indication that this isn’t a mass produced cover letter. “If you can get someone’s title that’s very important,” explains Beth Conyngham, President of Conyngham Partners, an executive search firm. To find someone’s title (if it is not on the job listing) try searching the company’s website, the person’s name (try LinkedIn!), or call the company and speak to a receptionist who will be able to give you more information. You do not necessarily need to put your own address on the letter—especially as that information should be on your resume. But definitely include immediate contact information (email/phone number)! Read on to find where you should include that information.

Step 2: Choose a professional font

While this may seem pretty standard, it’s actually really important. Always send out cover letters in Times New Roman. It’s a classic font that won’t create problems. And WriteExpress.com explains “The serif font uses small horizontal lines and flourishes that carry the eye along and make the text easier to read than the rigid vertical lines of a sans serif font.” May sound pretty meaningless, but why risk it?

Step 3: Salutation

“It should be Dear Mr./Ms./Mrs. COLON. A comma is informal and casual and a colon is business-like and this is business,” said Conyngham. But what to do if you’re faced with an ambiguous name like Devon or Ryan? “Ambiguous names, that’s always a quandary,” Conyngham said. “The proper thing to do would be to call the company and say I’m writing a letter to Devon/Ryan should I address them as Mr. or Mrs.?” Might be awkward but you know what would be more awkward? Getting it wrong. Other options to figuring out the person’s gender? Searching for the person on Google or Google images, or even Facebook.

Step 4: Immediately introduce what job you're looking for (and yourself!)

Start with a basic introduction sentence to the cover letter such as: Please consider this letter and my attached resume for employment as a summer sales intern at Best Company, Inc.“Every cover letter should be very specific to the job you’re going after,” Conyngham said. “If you’re applying for a job, it should be in response to your ad on Monster.com or wherever you saw it. Reference the job, where you found it, and the date. If there is a number beside it you should reference that as well. You want to give the reader as much explicit information as you can about the job to which you are applying. Make it easy for them.” Then, don’t forget to say who you are! Quickly introduce yourself, your school, and your year! This is especially important if you’re applying for a job in a big company. Tell them you’re applying for an internship in the specific department you’re interested in or tell them what job you want. You wouldn’t want to be applying for a job in sales for a company and not specify the job…and then end up in human resources.

Step 5: Compliment the company

“Say something specific about the company BEFORE YOU TALK ABOUT YOURSELF,” Conyngham said. “For example, ‘I’ve always been passionate about Your Company’ or ‘it’s always been in line with my career goals.’ This is either at the top or the bottom of your cover letter, not in the middle. There isn’t a right way or a wrong way to do that but it’s got to be included.” Make sure you make it clear why this is the company you want to work for. Make them feel special and as if they are your #1 choice! For example, if you wanted to work for Forever 21 you could say: “Forever 21 is a fast-paced environment which is ideal because I like working under pressure and quickly. I am particularly impressed with Forever 21’s ability to quickly take high fashion inspiration and turn it into affordable clothing that is exceptionally fashion forward.”

Step 6: Quickly tell them why you're great

Choose your best qualities and state them clearly and efficiently in your second paragraph. If you say: I feel I am well qualified for this position because I am deadline-oriented, organized, a leader, a professional, a self-starter, a hard worker, creative, dedicated, positive, punctual, eager to learn, adaptable, sociable, dedicated, dynamic, reliable, mature, efficient, a team player, analytical, a problem solver, dependable, communicative, motivated, and have great attention to detail all you will do is BORE THEM WITH BUZZWORDS. “Avoid the buzzwords and in a sentence or two say something that really captures your experience and why you’re appropriate for this role,” Conyngham reiterated. “You should talk about your resume and the experience that relates to this job. My experience makes me uniquely qualified because of this, this and this.”

STEP 7: Wrap it up

“Say when you’re available for an interview in person or on the phone and how to reach you. You should also say ‘If I don’t hear from you I will follow up with you next week.’ A cover letter should be followed up with an absolute date of when you will follow up with them if they don’t follow up with you,” explained Conyngham.

STEP 8: Bye!

Conyngham’s advice? Close with a “very best regards” and your name (obviously) and call it a day. “I think you only want two main paragraphs. Short and sweet,” Conyngham said, noting that reading cover letters gets tedious. But in my experience, if something on your resume needed particular clarifying—a unique position perhaps—it’s okay to clear it up, as long as you aren’t repetitive with what’s on your resume. Check out the model below for a guide about how to write the two main paragraphs and a closing paragraph!

STEP 9: Proofread, proofread, and, oh, proofread

Then send that thing out and wait for a call back (and if not, touch base with them!) And now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for…a sample cover letter to show you how to put it all together!

March 21, 2014

Ms. Jane Smith
Vice President of Sales Best Company, Inc.
118 5th Ave. New York, NY 10036

Dear Ms. Smith:

Please consider this letter and my attached resume for employment as a 2014 summer sales intern at Best Company, Inc. My name is Cara Sprunk and I will be completing my sophomore year at State University in May. I am extremely interested in working at Best Company, Inc. Since I first became interested in sales I have had extreme respect for Best Company, Inc. and believe it truly personifies what a great company can do with an innovative product. Not only do I think that I would learn a great deal about the sales industry from Best Company, Inc., but I also think my unique skills would make me a highly valued intern.

At State University, I am president of the sales club, the marketing manager of the marketing club, and a sales associate at Clothing & Co. These positions have helped me become extremely organized with my time, as well as taught me the inner workings of marketing including psychological marketing techniques and the relationship skills to facilitate good employee-client relations for continuous sales. I would love to speak on the phone to learn more about the sales internship or to schedule an interview. I can be reached at (201)-555-5555 or [email protected] anytime. If I do not hear from you I will contact you on April 10 about the sales internship. Thank you so much for considering my candidacy.

Very best regards,
Cara Sprunk


In a hurry? Jump straight to our jobs page!

View jobs →

How to write an internship cover letter

Writing an internship cover letter is like peeling one of those big oranges. It’s tricky, and you can lose hope along the way, but it is necessary if you want to get to the fruit.

Read on for a step-by-step guide to writing a cover letter for an internship.

Before we begin...

Before we dive in, it might be a good idea to identify what an internship cover letter actually is. Otherwise, this could all get very confusing. A cover letter is a formal letter that is sent to an employer with a CV. Your cover letter should outline who you are, why you are interested in the internship, and why you are sending the employer your CV.

The primary aim of a cover letter is to introduce yourself to an employer, and silently urge them to read your CV. A cover letter should be short, and to the point. You do not need describe every single one of your talents.

The content of your cover letter should tease what is to come in your CV. To tantalise the employer, so that they are certain to read all of your CV, and invite you for an interview.

Step 1: To whom it may concern,

The opening address in a cover letter is remarkably important. It’s like the first flight of an albatross chick. If it takes to the wind, it will soar off the beach and into the sky, to a life of internships and career opportunities. If it falls and lands in the ocean, its feather will get wet, and it will almost immediately be ripped apart by tiger sharks.

If you address your cover letter to the wrong person, or to nobody all, tiger sharks will be the least of your problems. Recruiters and employers are woefully unimpressed by cover letters that are addressed to –

Dear Sir/Madam, and they go absolutely bananas if an internship cover letter begins with –

To whom it may concern,

How do you avoid their wrath? Find the name of the person who will be reading your cover letter. Start your internship cover letter like this:

Dear Full Name,             e.g. Dear John Smith,

Dear Mr Surname,          e.g. Dear Mr Smith,

Dear Ms Surname,         e.g. Dear Ms. Smith

(always write Ms instead of Miss/Mrs, don’t presume marital status)

Finding the recruiter’s name is not always easy. Sometimes, it can be like trying to find Where’s Wally in a book that is smaller than the ankle socks on a particularly small beetle. If you are struggling, you have a number of options…

  1.     1. Ring the company, and ask for the name of the person who is tasked with reading the cover letters for the internship you are applying for. (You could do this by email too).

Many organisations have a ‘no name’ policy for confidentiality reasons, so if they can’t give you a name…

  1.     2. Address your cover letter to the head of the department your internship is in.
  2.     3. If you cannot find the name of person that handles recruitment, address your internship letter to someone that works in human resources (HR).
  3.     4. As a last resort, address your cover letter to someone in the team you are applying to join.

If you address your cover letter any of these people, they will forward it to the relevant person. Your efforts will be recognised. There will be much cheering and clapping of hands.

Address your cover letter for an internship with Dear Sir/Madam or To whom it may concern… and your application will be treated like a turkey at Christmas – and not in a good way.

If you’re interested in finding out more about internships, visit our Internship Zone.

Step 2: Intro

Now that we have the first three words of your internship cover letter sorted, you can relax. For about three seconds. It’s time to tackle the body of your internship cover letter.

You need to specify what internship you are applying for. Write something along the lines of…

I am writing in regards of the vacancy for the consultancy internship with PwC,

Employers might be hiring interns for a number of different programmes; you need to ensure that you are being considered for the correct role.

It’s also a good idea to reference where you found the internship vacancy. Employers love to know what channels students use when looking for jobs. Here is an example –

as advertised on RateMyPlacement. Please find my CV attached.

Step 3: Company research

Now it’s time to let the recruiter know why you are interested in the internship. Don’t write ‘because mother told me to’. You want to give specific reasons why the company, or the content of the course have drawn you to this internship.

Do some research about the company that is organising the internship. Below is a list of areas that you should focus your research on…

  • Origins of company
  • Has the company been in the news recently
  • Any major projects the company have been involved in
  • Background of directors or the manager of the team you're applying to
  • Company values/vision

If you want to do some research on the programme you are applying for, check for any case studies or reviews written by previous interns.

RateMyPlacement has nearly 20,000 reviews of internships with some of the UK’s top employers. Each review is written by an intern, to offer honest advice and insight into their work experience. You can find our internship reviews here…

Now that you’ve done your research, you can return to your cover letter. Craft this paragraph around the question: why do you want to do this internship? Here is an example of how to approach this –

I am particularly drawn to this internship at PwC because of its concentration on sustainability and climate change consultancy. PwC is the market-leader in this field, and I am fascinated by the strategies PwC puts in place to help an organisation meet its social and environmental goals. I have been reading about PwC’s recent project, involving the implementation of new sustainability procedures in government buildings across the UK. My involvement in the ‘Clear Up Our Campus’ campaign at university was similar, and makes me a perfect candidate for this internship.

Here, you have shown you have specified why you are attracted to the course; you have demonstrated that you understand what the internship consists of; you have even commented on a recent project.

You have killed three ostrich-sized birds with one stone. Fantastic.

Step 4: Work experience & qualifications

Now we move onto your work experience, skills and qualifications, and why they make you perfect for the internship.

Ensure that you continue to keep the content of your internship cover letter relevant to the role on offer. If you can do a passable impression of Morgan Freeman, that’s great, but it won’t improve your chances of getting an interview.

What unique skills can you bring to the company? What previous work experience has prepared you for this internship? If you can answer these questions, employers will be under your spell. As if you were Hermione Granger. Or Ronald Weasley.

Try something like this –

As my CV describes, I am two years into a Sustainable Engineering degree, achieving high grades in modules that focussed on sustainable planning in urban environments. My studies have imparted a groundwork of knowledge, and analytical skills that are crucial for a career in this field of consultancy. I also have three years of work experience at The Bear Factory, which has imparted great collaborative skills.

Step 5: Outro

In this closing section, thank the recruiter for considering your application, and express your interest/availability for attending an interview. One sentence would do it.

It may seem strange, thanking a recruiter for considering your application. It’s very polite. Very wholesome. Something Tom Hanks would do. It is a great way of finishing your cover letter for an internship. Write –

Thank you for considering my application, I look forward to the opportunity to discuss the programme further in an interview.

Step 6: Ta-ra

If you started your covering letter with a personal name, such as ‘Dear Susie,’ end it with Yours SincerelyIf you didn’t manage to find the recruiter’s name, put Yours Faithfully.

Pen down and go find some cake. You’ve just finished your cover letter.

Internship cover letter example

The examples from each step in this guide have been put together to form a full example of an internship cover letter. This example is for a consultancy internship with PwC.

Dear John Smith,

I am writing in regards of the vacancy for the consultancy internship with PwC, as advertised on RateMyPlacement. Please find my CV attached.

I am particularly drawn to this internship at PwC because of its concentration on sustainability and climate change consultancy. PwC is the market-leader in this field, and I am fascinated by the strategies PwC puts in place to help an organisation meet its social and environmental goals. I have been reading about PwC’s recent project, involving the implementation of new sustainability procedures in government buildings across the UK. My involvement in the ‘Clear Up Our Campus’ campaign at university was similar, and makes me a perfect candidate for this internship.

As my CV describes, I am two years into a Sustainable Engineering degree, achieving high grades in modules that focussed on sustainable planning in urban environment. My studies have imparted a groundwork of knowledge, and analytical skills that are crucial for a career in this field of consultancy. I also have three years of work experience at The Bear Factory, which has imparted great collaborative skills.

Thank you for considering my application, I look forward to the opportunity to discuss the programme further in an interview.

Yours Sincerely,

Your Name.

Before you leave!

Before you return to watching The Crystal Maze, here are some top tips for you to remember when writing your cover letter.

  • - DON’T lie about work experience/qualifications. Recruiters are like Jessica Fletcher (from Murder, She Wrote) when discovering the truth.
  • - DON’T overshare. A cover letter (and CV) shouldn’t include personal information.
  • - TAILOR your cover letter to the internship you are applying for.
  • - DON’T undersell yourself. Remember Enrique Iglesias’ Hero. Your cover letter shouldn’t be a list of things you don’t have.
  • - DON’T forget to proof-read, and check for spelling and grammar.
  • - DON’T use clichés, or describe yourself using application buzzwords, such as ‘conscientious’ + ‘dynamic’. A panda can be conscientious and dynamic.

Register for Job Alerts & Careers Advice. It's FREE!

If you are applying for an internship, check out our blog Internship CV: Your Guide & Template. It has an absolutely cracking CV template, and seven foolproof steps to writing a CV that employers will want to take home and frame.

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Cover Letter Sample For Internship Application Process”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *