Writing A Synthesis Essay Sample

Many sources of information exist: from college textbooks to academic journals and websites. Many students can’t handle the research properly, so they get stuck each time they try to understand how to write a synthesis essay. If you know the way to work with information, it is half the battle.

“What is a synthesis essay?” If you have this question, the information below shared by the professors from top colleges will be useful. How to write a synthesis essay AP English? A serious question requires a serious answer. Ask the online academic writers & editors for help without investing plenty of money to have any type of homework done due tomorrow!

How to Write a Synthesis Essay: Basic Knowledge

The way student writes his/her essay depends on the selected sources and amount of related information. Pick 2-5 texts to analyze. The main points to consider in this type of academic assignment are:

  • What are the specific ideas discussed by each of the selected writers?
  • Do the writers who come up with the same conclusion apply the same ideas or do they offer various ideas on a single topic to conclude in the same way?
  • Do the 1st writer’s ideas support the opinions of another writer?
  • Do the writers of the selected sources who disagree cover similar issue, or do they cover different aspects?
  • Are any of the points mentioned the same points in various words?

The next point to highlight is the official definition of this type of academic essay, and the general essay writing structure called an outline.

What is a Synthesis Essay?

Before learning how to write a synthesis essay, it is critical to define this term. Synthesis refers to gathering data from various sources and creating a whole content out of it; an academic essay is a writing assignment teachers give to test student’s knowledge and skills on the particular topic. By combining these definitions, a student may guess what it means. Many sources of information exist: it is important to pick primary/secondary sources that are relevant, up-to-date (no older than 5 years), and credible (meaning a student can trust people who wrote that). Non-written sources are a good idea for inspiration. Be attentive during the class lectures, observations, and interviews.

The heart of such essay is extensive research on the assigned topic – the writer should know multiple approaches to bringing out a concept from various sources. The next stage is mixing them and creating a convective piece of writing. The goal of any essay is to draw reader’s attention to the existing problem no matter what the topic/field of study is.

How to Write a Synthesis Essay Outline?

The point-by-point structure is what every student needs to learn how to write a synthesis essay outline. An outline is similar to the table of contents. It contains the categories + subcategories on the given topic the writer plans to cover in the piece. An essay organization will look this way:

  1. Introduction with a hook & thesis statement.
  2. A single point discussed by 2 or more sources of information.
  3. A 2nd point covered by 2 or more sources.
  4. An optional section with a single or more basic points covered in a single article each.
  5. Conclusion with the restated thesis, summary, and powerful concluding sentence.

Synthesis Essay Outline: Specific Example of Organization

If the student works with a single source at a time, such “source-by-source” structure will be considered weak. It is not enough to provide a summary of each observed text. Synthesis is about bringing together, analyzing both, comparing & contrasting, whatever – it is not about exploring a single source. It is a good idea to come up with a couple of paragraphs before the conclusion to synthesize points discovered in several sources.

A source-by-source structure is the most popular. Here is an example of fair organization:

  1. Introduction
  2. Summary of text #1
  3. Summary of text #2
  4. Summary of text #3
  5. Synthesis paragraph – a single commonality among the analyzed texts
  6. Synthesis paragraph – one more similar trait shared by the analyzed texts
  7. Conclusion with some predictions and implementations

If you need a particular example, look at this one:

  1. Introduction (High school football, “Nowhere to run: Consequences of high school football” by Robert Wayne and “The impact of high school football on students’ scores” by John Legman, thesis statement: “There is a strong correlation between the low high school scores and participating in local sports activities, especially football team.”
  2. Introduce 1st idea related to the topic: Those who join high school football teams tend to show a rapid drop in academic performance during the semester.
  • Text #1 perspective on that topic
  • Text #2 perspective on that theme
  1. A 2nd idea related to the topic: High school football team member initiate bullying. Both performance and behavior suffer.
Text #1 treatment of the issue
Text #2 treatment of the issue
  1. Conclusion

Synthesis Essay Introduction

Students who wonder how to write an AP English synthesis essay should begin with the synthesis essay introduction. In AP English test, synthesis essay is a common phenomenon. To give your essay a chance to survive with the high score, it is important to make the audience want to read the paper from cover to cover. In this case, the audience is made of the strict graders, which makes the mission complicated.

If a student opens his essay with a powerful hook sentence, the chances of writing a successful piece go up. Try these ideas:

End up the introduction with the thesis statement. Find some examples in this article.

If a student experiences problems with starting the essay or overcoming a writer’s block, he/she should try using one of the special writing applications.

The Principle of Writing a Synthesis Essay Thesis

A synthesis essay thesis serves as the main argument of the entire paper. It is a full sentence or few that identify the academic essay on a chosen topic in a significant manner. A thesis should be impressive as an essay title. A student must stress the importance of the discussed topic and focus on one of the existing opinions towards the issue. A thesis should not sound weak/general – narrow it down! A thesis should come across as a probing question the writer is trying to answer/defend in the eventual lines of the text.

Synthesis Essay Conclusion Example

For a better understanding of synthesis essay conclusion example, have a look below.

“With the help of field experts like Robert Wayne and John Legman along with their studies called “Nowhere to run: Consequences of high school football” and “The impact of high school football on students” respectively, the essay proved that a strong correlation between the high school football engagement and drop in academic performance exist in most of the United States educational institutions, but football is not the primary cause. There is not enough information to make a final decision. Among other possible causes, the researchers name regular depressions and stresses associated with the family conflicts, overloaded homework schedule, and problems with girlfriends/boyfriends.”

15 Synthesis Essay Topics for Beginners

The last thing to include in this informative article is a list of good synthesis essay topics.

  1. Write an essay describing the impact of World War II on Eastern Europe
  2. Influence of social media on college students
  3. Impact of texting on teens’ grammar
  4. Talk about the mindset of ISIS hardliners
  5. The universal system of patriarchy and its outcomes
  6. An insight into e-commerce
  7. Positive awareness of the sexual education among adolescents
  8. In-depth analysis of the algorithms that make cryptocurrency work
  9. The impact of American art on modern European music
  10. The evolution of beauty standards throughout centuries
  11. The policy of expansionism of some Asian countries
  12. Influence of housing estates on ecology
  13. The way high school football harms the student’s academic performance
  14. Deforestation & agriculture
  15. The steps taken by different nationalities to fight global warming issues

Synthesis Essay Example: Smallpox

Students who require examples to understand the topic better should focus on this section. We offer a good essay example written on the medical topic.

“The paper is focused on smallpox, s severe disease with the possible fatal outcome that has influenced the entire history of medicine. The in-depth study of the health condition has led to the appearance of a new treatment. It prevented millions of people over the course of history from death and gave a chance to humanity to overcome other serious illnesses.

“Amherst and Smallpox,” an article taken from NativeWeb, defines smallpox as a deadly disease spread by some virus. Through the lungs, the virus penetrates the entire lymphatic system and may infect the blood.

“Smallpox: Only Adults Suffer” article by Kelly Donor insists on the fact that this disease is not that threatening today as the prevention measures are stronger. The writer proves her words with the help of recent studies. They show the significant drop in fatal outcomes during the last decade.

Both of the explored sources agree that a special program of vaccinations by The World Health Organization made smallpox one of the 2 infectious illnesses that have been eradicated in full. It means that severer health conditions exist without any effective treatment. Unlike Donor, NativeWeb authors do not think everything is over; they insist that the final traces of the virus should be destroyed to guarantee the safety from this disease.”

Conclusion

To sum up, to learn how to write a good synthesis essay, a student should discover more about the world of research. If it is about learning how to write an AP English synthesis essay, it is important to open the official AP website with the current requirements and study the grading rubric to understand what to focus on. Does it sound difficult? You have a way out if you are running out of time and nerves. Contact professional academic writers for hire at any time of day/night to have an academic homework done within the set timeframes. Writing can be easier than you think.

The word “synthesis” is defined as a combination of elements to form a connected whole. Thus, a synthesis essay definition is an essay that combines different ideas into a whole to prove a point (otherwise called the thesis). Often, it comes with a text that you should analyze.


Table Of Contents


Writing Process

A key factor of writing a synthesis essay is an analysis of a given text or a prompt. In order to successfully analyze it, you must comprehend the text’s purpose, rhetoric, and the argument that the author’s claim, in other words, you are answering the question: “So what?”. Then, you must build your own claim, and write an essay around that.

Most Common Topics

A synthesis essay prompt must be negotiable. Like in the EssayPro's example above, Andrew Jackson’s negative views on Native American people were widely supported, today, however, they would be appalling. Depending on your assignment, you may have to choose a primary text. Choose a text that might have opposing viewpoints.

Good topics would be ones that are debatable, for example:

  • Daylight savings
  • Minimum wage
  • Abortion
  • Immigration policy
  • Global warming
  • Gun control
  • Social media

How Do I Write A Thesis?

Once you pick a topic of your paper, read your sources and establish your position. Make sure you thoroughly analyze the sources and get a good understanding of them, structure your claim or argument and write your thesis.

Example: Andrew Jackson’s fear of the Native American “savages” reflects the prejudices and ideas of the colonist people in the Union and the Congress.*

How Do I Write An Outline?

Creating an outline will help maintain the structure of your paper. If your essay is split into three parts, split your outline into three chunks. Paste supporting evidence, sub-arguments, and specific points in the appropriate sections. Make sure that every point somehow proves the claim in your thesis. Extra information or tangents will only hinder your essay. However, if information goes against your central claim, then you should acknowledge it as it will make your essay stronger. Make sure you have read all of your sources. When writing about the sources, do not summarize them; synthesis denotes analysis, not plot-summary.

Example:

  • Introduction
  • Thesis
    • Main point 1
    • Main point 2
    • Main point 3
  • Body
  • Main point 1
    • Evidence (quote from a source)
    • Analysis of Evidence
  • Main point 2
    • Evidence (quote from a source)
    • Analysis of Evidence
  • Main point 3
    • Evidence (quote from a source)
    • Analysis of Evidence
  • Conclusion
  • Restate main points and answer unanswered questions

Read more about how to write a great INTRODUCTION

How Do I Format My Essay?

The format depends on what style is required by your teacher or professor. The most common formats are: MLA, APA, and Chicago style. APA is used by fields of Education, Psychology, and Science. MLA is used for citing Humanities, and Chicago style is used for Business, History, and Fine Arts. Purdue Owl is a format guide that focuses mainly on MLA and APA, and Easybib is a citation multitool for any of your external sources.

Some key points are:

  • Times New Roman 12 pt font double spaced
  • 1” margins
  • Top right includes last name and page number on every page
  • Titles are centered
  • The header should include your name, your professor’s name, course number and the date (dd/mm/yy)
  • The last page includes a Works Cited

APA Format

Some key points are:

  • Times New Roman 12 pt font double spaced 1” margins
  • Include a page header on the top of every page
  • Insert page number on the right
  • An essay should be divided into four parts: Title Page, Abstract, Main Body, and References.

How do I write an AP English Synthesis Essay?

AP English Language and Composition is an extremely rigorous course that requires you to write essays that demonstrate deep understanding of the subject matter. In fact, if on the AP exam, your essay has perfect grammar and structure, you might still be awarded just 1 out of 9 points for not “defending, challenging, or qualifying your claim.” Sounds difficult, but it is doable. Before entering any AP class, it is best to read over the course overview and become familiar with the exam.

While writing, focus on the three branches of the AP English and Composition course: argument, synthesis, and rhetorical analysis.

Argument is the easiest component; create your claim and find specific supporting evidence. Convince your reader that you are right.

Synthesis requires you to read into multiple perspectives and identify an agreement and a disagreement between sources. This step is crucial to finding your own claim.

Rhetorical analysis deals with the author and his intentions. What was their purpose for writing this? Who is their intended audience? How does the author appeal to the audience and how does he structure his claim?

Essay Tips

There are two acronyms that are helpful with the three AP Lang writing branches.

Tip #1: SOAPS

Example text: Andrew Jackson’s speech to the Congress about sending Native Americans to the West.

Speaker: Identify the speaker of the piece, then analyze for bias and apply any prior knowledge that you have on the speaker.

Example: President Andrew Jackson had a bias against Native Americans. A piece written by Andrew Jackson about Native Americans will probably be written with a bias against him.

Occasion: Determine the time and the place of the written text, then identify the reason the text was written. Even if you aren’t sure of the reason, assume one and make your claim around it.

Example: Andrew Jackson was in office from 1829 to 1837. At this time, the Congress sent Native Americans to the West in order to clear the land for the colonists. Jackson was the one who made the proposal.

Audience: Who was the text directed to?

Example: Andrew Jackson’s speech was directed to a council.

Purpose: What is the text trying to say? Here, you analyze the tone of the text.

Example: Andrew Jackson appeals to pathos by calling Indians “savages”. His purpose is to portray Native Americans in a negative light, so the Congress passes the Indian Removal Act.

Subject: What is the main idea? What is the claim?

Example: Andrew Jackson wants the Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act because he believes Native Americans are uncultured and savage people.

Tip #2: Logos, Ethos, and Pathos

As you’ve probably learned before, Logos appeals to reason, Pathos appeals to emotion, and Ethos appeals to moral philosophy or credibility. However, for the AP Lang exam requires a wider understanding of the three.

If the text uses facts, statistics, quotations, and definitions, the speaker is appealing to Logos. Constituting various backup information is an extremely effective for people who want to persuade.

If the text uses vivid imagery and strong language it denotes Pathos, which is used to connect the audience to a piece emotionally; it is hardest to change the mind of a person who is linked to a subject via a strong emotion.

If the text attempts to demonstrate the speakers reliability or credibility, it is a direct appeal to Ethos. Using the example above, Andrew Jackson could have appealed to Ethos by stating the fact that he is the President of the United States, and thus, knows what is best for the union.

Often, Logos, Ethos, and Pathos lead to the use of logical fallacies.

Tip #3: DIDLS

This is a good shorthand for all textual analysis. While reading a text, try to pinpoint Diction, Imagery, Details, Language, and Sentence Structure in a piece. If anything stands out, add it to your analysis.

Rubric

  • High range essay (8-9 points)
  • Effectively develops a position on the assigned topic.
  • Demonstrates full understanding of the sources or text.
  • Correctly synthesizes sources and develops a position. The writer drives the argument, not the sources.
  • The writer’s argument is convincing.
  • The writer makes no general assertions and cites specific evidence for each point. His/her evidence is developed and answers the “so what?” question.
  • The essay is clear, well-organized, and coherent. It is a stand alone piece rather than an exam response.
  • Contains very few grammatical and spelling errors or flaws, if any.

Note: 8-9 essays are an extreme rarity. A strong ‘7’ paper can jump to an 8-9 if the writing style is mature and perceptive.

Middle-Range Essay (57)

  • Adequately develops a position on the assigned topic.
  • Demonstrates sufficient understanding of the ideas developed in sources
  • Sufficiently summarizes the sources and assumes some control of the argument. ‘5’ essays are less focused than ‘6’ and ‘7’.
  • The writer's argument is sufficient but less developed.
  • Writer successfully synthesizes the sources and cites them.
  • Writer answers the “So what?” question but may use generalizations or assertions of universal truth. Writer cites own experience and specific evidence.
  • Essay is clear and well organized. ‘5’ essays less so.
  • Contains few minor errors of grammar or syntax.

Note: A ‘7’ is awarded to papers of college-level writing.
A ‘5’ on one of the AP English Language and Composition essays designates a 3 on the AP exam. It most likely relies on generalizations has limited control of the claim and argument. ‘5’ essays often lose focus and digress.

Low-Range Essays (1-4)

  • Inadequately develops a position on the assigned topic.
  • The author misunderstands and simplifies the ideas developed in the sources.
  • Over-summarizes the sources, lets the sources drive the argument.
  • Writer has weak control of organization and syntax. Essay contains numerous grammatical/spelling errors.
  • Writer does not cite the sources correctly, skips a citation, or cites fewer than the required minimum of the sources.
  • Notes: ‘4’ or ‘3’ essays do assert an argument but do not sufficiently develop it.
  • A ‘2’ essay does not develop an argument.
  • A 1-2 essay has severe writing errors and do not assert a claim.

Synthesis Essay Example

Essay Writing Advice From Our Professional Team

James Owen, online essay writer from EssayPro

The article reviews the basics of how to write a synthesis essay as well as how to dissect and analyze text when writing an AP English essay. One thing I would like to reemphasize is the importance of your thesis statement. When you write an essay for class or exam, make sure to state your argument clearly. If the reader of your essay doesn’t understand your point of view then what you’ve written is futile.

My advice is: when writing an essay in a short period (such as in an exam room) make sure to articulate your argument in every paragraph and connect every single one of your ideas to the thesis. My tip is to write your thesis down on a piece of paper and reread it at every point to ensure that the information applies and reinforces what you’ve stated in your thesis. This tip also goes for when you are writing a longer piece of writing, as it is very easy to lose focus and stray away from your main point.

Struggling With Writing an Essay?

Still having trouble crafting a synthesis essay? Need editing or writing help? You should seek advice from professional writers. Here at EssayPro, writers have written countless papers and are experts in their field. You can request to write your paper or editing or proofreading assistance. Rest assured that your paper is in good hands!

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